Adventures in the Book Trade (Part 6)

In which The Author fears for a young man’s life

One of my pals has just shared a nice cartoon on Facebook, based on an imagined (yet plausible) conversation between a couple of well-known comic book characters:

1779095_613759398679447_600116233_n

It reminded me of a customer who came into our bookshop one morning, looking for an eighteenth birthday present for her son. All she knew was that he was a fan of Nirvana, and she’d spent some time looking through the various books about the kings of Grunge.
Eventually, with a worried expression on her face, she approached the counter. She explained the situation, and commented that all the books about Nirvana and/or Kurt Cobain went into detail about his death.
‘The thing is,’ she said, ‘he’s still quite impressionable. I don’t want to get him anything that talks about suicide.’
That put us in a bit of a predicament, as you can imagine.
‘Well, you see the problem is,’ I said, none too sympathetically, ‘that Kurt Cobain was a junkie who blew his face off with a gun. It’s probably the most famous thing about him. All the books are going to mention it.’
‘Oh,’ she said. ‘In that case, I might get him something else.’ She headed back to the music section and carried on browsing.
When I glanced over a few minutes later, she was leafing through a biography of John Lennon (who was shot, aged 40.) I carried on serving in the mean time. When I looked across again, she was holding a book about Jimi Hendrix (who choked to death, aged 27.) Then I went for my break, leaving one of the girls at the counter.
I returned twenty minutes later. By this time, the same customer had moved on to the Classical Music section. She was skimming through a book on Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who famously died aged just 35.
I drew my colleague’s attention to her current selection, and whispered, ‘I really don’t think her son will make it to eighteen at this rate.’
Advertisements

Please tell me if you've enjoyed this (or if you haven't.) Feel free to rate it, 'like' it, and/or leave a comment.

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s